Apprentice and trainee numbers in South Australian decline but we have employers desperate to hire


A new article in The Advertiser today reports on the decline in the number of apprenticeships. Despite this, we have a huge demand from employers wanting to hire apprentices.

The biggest obstacle seems to be the number of under 21’s who either do not have a drivers license or have lost their licenses. The Government needs to consider reversing the policy that requires people to be on their ‘L’ plates for 12 months. Along with this, the loss of a drivers license can result in being completely excluded from working in the building and construction industry. Using public transport to get to different job sites, some of which are located in new suburbs without any infrastructure – is not practical or even possible most of the time.

Below is the article from The Advertiser:

THE number of traineeships and apprenticeships being undertaken in South Australia has continued to decline, a new report shows.

South Australia’s Training and Skills Commission 2017 Annual Report, tabled in State Parliament on Tuesday, showed last year there were 15,700 apprentices and trainees in training from 17,100 the year before – an 8.2 percent drop. An estimated 6100 apprentices and trainees successfully completed their training contract in the 12 months between July 1, 2016 and June 30, 2017 – again down from the year before when there was 6700 – a drop of 9 percent.

In the report, Commission chair Michael Boyce said SA has followed a national trend.“Apprenticeship and traineeship activity has declined nationwide since July 2012 due to multiple factors,” Mr Boyce said.“The significant decrease in traineeship activity was primarily driven by the removal of almost all funding to employers for employing existing workers under the Australian Government’s Australian Apprenticeships Incentives Programme.“Challenging economic conditions reduced apprenticeship commencements between 2012-13 and 2015-16.“However, the impact of these changes has lessened in the past three years, with preliminary data indicating apprenticeship commencements have stabilised, while the decline in traineeship commencements has slowed.”The new State Government has promised $100 million over the forward estimates to create 21,000 new apprenticeships or traineeships in SA. Last month The Advertiser revealed the new program to expand skills training for young people in SA will start from July, despite ongoing negotiations to unlock $100 million in crucial federal cash.

Source: Apprentice and trainee numbers in South Australian decline | Adelaide Now

Looking for an apprenticeship? Enrol in the Certificate II in Construction (CPC20112)


The Certificate II in Construction (CPC20112) is often referred to as a ‘Pre-apprenticeship’ course. This is because employers looking to hire apprentices frequently recruit current students and graduates. Our next course starts 30th January 2018. The course will focus developing hand skills across tiling, bricklaying and plastering.

If you have been considering becoming an apprentice, but you’re not sure which trade to focus on, this course will give you an insight into several different trades as well as basic concreting and scaffolding. You will also have the opportunity to work alongside existing apprentices to find out what working in the building industry is like.

The course is open to applicants over 16 years old. Government funding is available to most applicants via the State governments WorkReady programme. Students enrolled at High School who are over 16 can also complete the course under TGSS funding.

The goal of this course is to help students into work within the building and construction industry. We have employers who are currently looking to hire apprentices and during the course, you will have the opportunity to be placed into work experience. Employers are generally seeking people under 21 with a drivers license and vehicle. There are employers willing to consider adult apprentices, but they are much less common than junior apprenticeships. If you would like to know more, or have any questions please contact us on 8367 5615.

Interested in an apprenticeship? Pre-apprenticeship Course Starts 30/1/2018


We have employers seeking Bricklaying, Tiling and Solid Plastering apprentices. The Certificate II in Construction aims to get students work ready, and into an apprenticeship.

Employers typically want applicants to be under 21, with a drivers license and some experience or a Cert II in Construction. There are opportunities for those over 21, usually in labouring jobs, but sometimes as adult apprentices.

Our next course starts Tuesday January 30th and runs for 10 weeks at 15 Jacobsen Crs, Holden Hill. Government-funded eligibility has been improved so more people have the opportunity to study.

Call us on 8367 5615 or email admin@fcta.com.au for more information.

Dates for  2018:

30/01/2018 – 06/04/2018

06/03/2018 – 11/05/2018

01/05/2018 – 06/07/2018

8am – 3:30pm Tuesday – Friday for 10 weeks at 15 Jacobsen Crs, Holden Hill.

This qualification requires 9 core units of competency and 6 electives to be completed. For more information on this training course and employability skills, please visit training.gov.au

Qualification Code: CPC20112

Core

Total qualification: Approx 500 hours depending on electives

Electives

Unit Code Unit Title Hours
CPCCOHS2001A Apply OHS requirements and procedures in the construction industry 20
CPCCCM10012A Work effectively in the General Construction Industry 20
CPCCCM1013A Plan and organise work 20
CPCCCM1014A Conduct workplace communication 20
CPCCCM1015A Carry out measurements and calculations 20
CPCCCM2001A Read and interpret plans and specifications 36
CPCCCM2006B Apply basic levelling procedures 8
CPCCCO2013A Carry out concreting to simple forms 20
CPCCCM2005B Use construction tools and equipment 96
CPCCCM2010B Work Safely at Heights 8
Unit Code Unit Title Hours
CPCCCM2008B Erect and dismantle restricted height scaffolding 40
CPCCCM2009A Carry out basic demolition 32
CPCCSF2004A Place and fix reinforcement materials 80
CPCCSP2003A Prepare surfaces for plastering 40
CPCCCM2007B Use explosive power tools 16
CPCCWF2002A

CPCCPB3001A

CPCCSP2002A

CPCCBL2002A

PLUS ONE OF THE FOLLOWINGUse wall & floor tiling equipment

Fix standard plasterboard wall sheets

Use solid plastering tools and equipment

Use bricklaying tools and equipment

96

60

80

30

 

How to get an apprenticeship in Adelaide


Getting an apprenticeship in South Australia can lead to a long term career in the Building and Construction Industry. That means working outdoors, earning an income while you study and having the opportunity to eventually be your own boss. The tricky part can be choosing which trade is the best fit. Pre-apprenticeship courses are an excellent way to try a number of trades before selecting which one you most enjoy.

Many people select the trade they want to focus on based on knowing someone working in that field. That doesn’t necessarily mean its the trade for you, but it is a good way to find out what working in the industry is like. At FCTA – Building Careers we have developed a pre-apprenticeship programme that allows people to try bricklaying, tiling, plastering, basic concreting and scaffolding. These are also the trades we train apprentices in. That means if you enrol in a pre-apprenticeship course with us, you will be working on some projects with existing apprentices. This is a great way to find out more about the trade.

Currently, we have a number of employers urgently looking to hire apprentices. The majority are after people under 21 who have a drivers license and car. If you are in the process of getting your license, most will consider your application. Adult apprenticeships aren’t as readily available. This is because the employer is paying anyone over 21 at the full rate. Many times employers will prefer to hire people over 21 as labourers instead.

The difference between labouring and an apprenticeship is a ‘Contract of Training’. That means that apprentices sign a binding contract with employers to work for them under the apprenticeship scheme. The benefits for apprentices are that they are paid to go to trade school to complete a Certificate III in their trade of choice, that’s the ‘earn and learn’ tag sometimes mentioned. Contracts are normally for 4 years, so getting an apprenticeship offers both job security and further education.

To help get an apprenticeship in Adelaide you can enrol in a pre-apprenticeship course, approach trades people directly or contact group training organisations (GTO). GTO’s are places like the HIA, TABMA, Maxima, CEG who hire apprentices directly and then place the apprentice with a ‘host’ employer. The Government has also set up a great website that explains the pathways for apprentices https://www.aapathways.com.au/

If you are considering an apprenticeship and you have questions, you can always arrange a time to talk to us or come in for a meeting. Our pre-apprenticeship courses run through out the year. If you would like to enrol, please call on 8367 5615 or email admin@fcta.com.au. The dates for our next courses are:

05/09/2017 – 10/11/2017

30/01/2018 – 06/04/2018

06/03/2018 – 11/05/2018

01/05/2018 – 06/07/2018

Advertised positions are often posted on Gumtree, Facebook, Seek & Indeed Jobs. Each morning a summary of these advertised roles are posted to our Facebook page.

 

 

 

Apprenticeships Available – Bricklaying, Tiling and Carpentry


We have employers looking to hire apprentices in the following trades:

  • Bricklaying – 6 positions available working metro Adelaide
  • Tiling – 4 positions available working all over Adelaide.
  • Carpentry – 12 positions available, 1 school based option working central Adelaide.

Applicants must be under 21 with a car and license. Trade apprenticeships have a high level of physical work so applicants must have a good level of fitness. Preference will be given to applicants who have completed a Pre-apprenticeship course and/or have trade experience. To apply contact Trisch on 83675615 or email trisch@fcta.com.au.

Pre-apprenticeship Certificate II in Construction Course Dates


If you are looking for an apprenticeship the Certificate II in Construction (CPC20112) course, is a great way to find out which trade you enjoy the most. Pre-apprenticeship students work side by side with existing apprentices. This gives students the chance to have some insight about what being an apprentice is like.

Students will gain an introduction into the following trades:

  • Bricklaying
  • Tiling
  • Plastering
  • Concreting
  • Scaffolding

Employers frequently contact FCTA seeking candidates for apprenticeships. They are generally seeking people under 21 who have a car and license and either experience in the industry or someone who has completed a pre-apprenticeship course.

As part of the Certificate II in Construction, students are placed into the trade for work experience. For students who have some previous experience, or show potential, this could happen at any time during the course. If there is an opportunity to secure an apprenticeship you will be placed out into the trade ASAP.

Pre-apprenticeship courses will run on the following dates:

05/09/2017 – 10/11/2017

30/01/2018 – 06/04/2018

06/03/2018 – 11/05/2018

01/05/2018 – 06/07/2018

The course is held at FCTA – Building Careers, 15 Jacobsen Crs Holden Hill South Australia. The duration of the course is 10 weeks, Tuesday – Friday 8am – 3:30pm. Please call 088367 5615 or email admin@fcta.com.au to book in a time to apply for the course.

Pre-Apprenticeship Course Starts June 27th 2017


The Certificate II in Construction (CPC20112) is commonly referred to as a pre-apprenticeship course because it helps students become apprentices. FCTA – Building Careers has been running pre-apprenticeship courses for over 15 years. We now have graduates from our pre-apprentice courses hiring their own apprentices!

Students will have the opportunity to gain an introduction into the following trades:

  • Tiling
  • Bricklaying
  • Plastering
  • Scaffolding (up to 4m)
  • Concreting

We have employers currently seeking apprentices. For your best opportunity at gaining an apprenticeship employers are generally seeking the following:

  • Good work ethic
  • Reliability
  • Drivers license and car
  • Able to follow instructions

Most seek applicants under 21 but some adult apprenticeships are available, and skilled labourers are always wanted. To book a place in the course email us at info@fcta.com.au or call 8367 5615. Applicants will be asked to attend a short interview followed by a tour of the facility by our trainers. To check your eligibility for WorkReady funding, visit http://www.skills.sa.gov.au/training-learning/check-your-eligibility. Payment plans are available for students not eligible for Government funding.

Pre-Apprenticeship Certificate II In Construction Starts 30th May 2017


Our next pre-apprenticeship course will be starting Tuesday May 30th at Holden Hill. If you are looking for an apprenticeship in South Australia, this is the course to give yourself the best chance possible. FCTA – Building Careers also trains apprentices, so students in the Certificate II in Construction (CPC20112) have the opportunity to work next to apprentices and find out about being an apprentice.

The pre-apprenticeship course focuses on the following trades:

  • Bricklaying
  • Tiling
  • Plastering
  • Scaffolding (up to 4m)
  • Introductory Concreting

We have strong links to the industry and are in direct contact with builders who currently, or previously have had apprentices. Often they will come to us directly for a recommendation on who to hire. While industry work experience isn’t mandatory for the Certificate II in Construction, we strongly encourage it and assist students to find places. This has been the way many of our students have secured apprenticeships.

This course is currently funded by WorkReady for eligible students, and by TGSS for students over 16 who are still at High School or are part of the ‘FLO’ programme. To check your eligibility click here

To book a time to come in and discuss the course call us on 8367 5615 or email: admin@fcta.com.au

Pre-apprenticeship Certificate II in Construction Starts 26th April 2017 with more dates announced


Our next pre-apprenticeship course will be starting Wednesday April 26th at Holden Hill. If you are looking for an apprenticeship in South Australia, this is the course to give yourself the best chance possible. FCTA – Building Careers also trains apprentices, so students in the Certificate II in Construction (CPC20112) have the opportunity to work next to apprentices and find out about tradie life.

The pre-apprenticeship course focuses on the following trades:

  • Bricklaying
  • Tiling
  • Plastering
  • Scaffolding (up to 4m)
  • Introductory Concreting

We have strong links to the industry and are in direct contact with builders who currently, or previously have had apprentices. Often they will come to us directly for a recommendation on who to hire. While industry work experience isn’t mandatory for the Certificate II in Construction, we strongly encourage it and assist students to find places. This has been the way many of our students have secured apprenticeships.

This course is currently funded by WorkReady for eligible students, and by TGSS for students over 16 who are still at High School or are part of the ‘FLO’ programme. To check your eligibility click here

To book a time to come in and discuss the course call us on 8367 5615 or email: admin@fcta.com.au

 

An apprentice carpenter, turned lawyer, turned politician writes about his experience in the trade


Students mustn’t ignore the trades

Written by: ANDREW WALLACE, The Australian 

Right now, more than a million Australians, are returning to university to continue their studies. For those in their final year their minds will be turning to some pressing questions: Am I going to get a job? How will I pay back my student debt? Yesterday’s ASG Planning for University Index suggests these questions are only going to become harder to answer, with rising costs over the next 10 years.

I did alright at school, but as a young man an indoor life was not for me. I became an apprentice carpenter and got to work on building sites in and around Melbourne in the mid-1980s. The majority of new university graduates will find work, but the numbers suggest that they might have been better off pursuing a different path, as I did.

Research by Graduate Careers Australia shows that in the first year after graduating from university, 74 per cent of new graduates who want one will find a full time job. Their average income is $54,000. However, the National Centre for Vocational Education tells us that this figure is 77.6 per cent for vocational graduates and that their median income is $56,000. In parts of the construction industry I have heard of new electricians earning $80,000.

Emerging from their training with better chances of immediate employment, higher starting incomes and greater prospects for self-employment, VET graduates face a bright future.

We often talk about training Australia’s young people for the jobs of tomorrow, but there are skilled jobs crying out to be filled today. The Department of Employment creates a skills shortage list every year of jobs where local businesses are finding it hard to recruit skilled people. In my state of Queensland you will not find public relations managers, civil engineers or lawyers on that list. These are all admirable professions, filled with talented people, but we have plenty of them.

What you will find on the wanted list are welders, chefs, carpenters and plasterers. These are the skilled workers that Australia desperately needs today. Many trades are listed as statewide shortages, meaning that employers are unable to fill or have considerable difficulty filling vacancies. It is a startling fact; in Queensland today, employers are finding it nigh impossible to find a skilled bricklayer, painter or butcher.

We need to tackle three challenges to deal with this serious shortage and provide a better future for hundreds of thousands of our young people.

First is the perception among some parents, employers and among young people themselves that vocational education is a second class option. The only way to change this perception is by showing off the great role models we have. Tradies do not tend to make a fuss and they are not known for talking about themselves. We have to do it for them. The federal government’s Australian Apprenticeships Ambassadors program is a start, identifying people who have achieved better pay and a more rewarding working life through an apprenticeship. We need to get these ambassadors far more coverage. This is the right answer, but it needs to go much further. We need to get these ambassadors into every school, parents group and youth centre to tell people first-hand about their success.

Second is the lack of information available to young people in their last years at school about the vocational paths that are available and how to access them. Our focus on getting a degree for all has left our careers advisers obsessed with university and too often clueless about apprenticeships. Too many kids are falling through the cracks. They know that university is not for them but they do not know what the alternative is. The government is spending $3 million on developing a new National Career Education Strategy to identify how we can provide more meaningful and balanced careers advice. That review must look at the example set for us by other countries where regular conversations about career options have been built into some children’s school life from age 11. These programs have been shown to create improved career outcomes from the kids who took part.

Third is the fact that too many businesses do not know how to offer an apprenticeship, and do not always do a great job when they do offer one. Again, the Turnbull Government is providing some help, in the form of the Australian Apprenticeships Support Network. Without that $190m a year there would no doubt be many more apprenticeships which are not completed. We should ensure that the help we offer is targeted, on a one to one basis to help companies and apprentices to work through any problems. We need to do much more though to educate companies on how to create and complete apprenticeship schemes, but not through superficial advertising and brochures. The only way to make a difference here is to get out into the workplace and engage with employers at a grassroots level.

Over the past 30 years I have seen a decline in the willingness of some employers to engage apprentices. We need to address that decline. We as a community, both in government and industry, need to incentivise employers. I am not just talking about money. We need to create a positive culture that says that it is an admirable thing to employ and train our young people, and we need to give employers tailored information that makes it clear how accessible and valuable an apprentice’s help can be.

Personally, I started out a chippy but I ended up a barrister. Now I am a Member of Parliament. After years as a self-employed builder I went to university. My trade gave me a way to support my family while I studied and the knowledge I had of the industry gave me a head start in construction law. My apprenticeship became for me a pathway to university, not an alternative to it. A vocational education can take you anywhere. Australia needs our young people to know that.